Oak

The rain comes down upon my leaves

and my dry center

shrinks about my roots,

and all the insects and

lizards pull themselves

into the rough old folds

of my trunk.

I am the meaning of shelter,

refuge for all the harried,

striving things

when the world,

in her sullen rejecting mood,

shoves them beyond her

with palms of wind.

In my twisted and weary branches,

do you not see your own pain,

man?

Do you feel how the universe,

presses down upon us both,

that heavy eternity

which only wants to rest and cease:

and we both must carry

its thousand-fold, weeping moons.

Man, you forget me,

your original bearer,

and huddle instead

under the skin

of my dead brothers,

and dam up my streams,

so that the rain

might not touch you.

The waters beside me

fill with your discarded effort:

rusted bicycles,

journeys, detergent,

those things that

sustain you barely.

And each year

fewer and fewer insects

scuttle about my infinite trunk.

When they have taken

all their colours

and burrowed deep

beneath the earth, at last,

what then will I shelter,

what precious things will I keep?

Are we not both,

you and I, man,

perishing with the

things we are losing?

 

Copyright Ricky Barrow 2014

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s